1. Janos Magasrevy
  2. Guides, Setups, Telemetry
  3. Wednesday, 25 November 2015
The following guide is about the theory behind setting up the brakes of a modern Formula 1 car in rFactor 2. Feel free to add your questions and comments below. Basic Brake Settings Brake BIAS (F:R) The brake BIAS is simply the distribution of braking forces between the front and rear wheels. A 50:50 setting would give the same force to both front and rear wheels. The brake BIAS is useful when trying to reduce braking distance, as well as to balance the car during braking to prevent it from snapping to a side. The setting tends to be more towards the front due to the weight transfer during braking. Ideally, you would like the balance to be close to 50:50 without snapping under braking. A good starting point is around 55:45 and work your way up or down depending on how the car feels. Brake Duct Size The brake duct size determines the air cooling to the brakes. If the duct is too large, there will be too much airflow and the brakes might be too cold on initial application. On the other hand, if the duct is too small, there will not be enough airflow and the brakes get too hot and start fading. Keep in mind that the brake duct increases drag and reduces downforce by introducing air underneath the car. Brake Pressure Is the amount of pressure that is put on the brake disc. It is useful to reduce locking wheels under braking as well as to regulate the peak brake temperature. Disc Thickness Is the thickness of the brake disc. Configure this high enough so that you don't run out of brake disc during a race.

As a side note, it would be nice if rFactor 2 had some telemetry data regarding this. Right now, there's no way to tell how much brake disc is left. How to tune the brakes First of all, you need to find out what is the brake response curve of the mod you are racing. In the HDV file ([url=index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=12:extracting-the-physics-files-out-of-an-rfactor-2-mod&catid=18:tips&Itemid=283]read this article on extracting the physics files out of a mod[/url]), look for: BrakeResponseCurve= Example: BrakeResponseCurve=(195,450,715,1610) Each wheel has its own BrakeResponseCurve, usually, front and rear are the same, but it is worth mentioning this.

[b]Parameter[/b]
[b]Number[/b]
[b]Meaning[/b]
First 195 Indicates the brake temperature at which braking torque is half the optimum. Second 450 Indicates the minimum brake temperature for optimal braking torque. Third 715 Indicates the maximum brake temperature for optimal braking torque. Last 1610 Indicates overheated temperature at which braking torque is half the optimum. Now you know that your optimum braking temperature is found between 450 and 715 degrees Celsius. Using a data analysis software, like Motec, you would check the brake temperature values, what you should keep an eye on is what is the temperature at the initial application of the brake. You would want this to be close to 450 degrees, anything far under that value and the braking torque will not be optimal. Then with the braking pressure, you would tune up the brakes so that the peak doesn't go too above the maximum optimal temperature of 715 degrees. It is okay if you go above the optimal, just make sure it is not for a long period of time while the brakes are pressed, you would be losing braking torque if that's the case. You should also configure alerts in Motec to notify you if the brake temperature has gone beyond 1610, which will certainly destroy them quickly. You should also tune in the brake BIAS so that the average temperature for the front brakes are almost the same to the ones on the rear, do this and you will have an even distribution where all brakes will fade out more or less the same amount during a race.
Janos Magasrevy
SRH Founder and Director
Who is viewing this page
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
0
Votes
Undo
Janos,
Could you please tell me if F1 the brakes we're using are carbon? Perhaps they're carbon ceramic or ceramic? I couldn't find that info anywhere...
Thanks in advance
Rich
Comment
There are no comments made yet.
Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
0
Votes
Undo
I don't believe rF2 mentions that Richard Haynie
Janos Magasrevy
SRH Founder and Director
Comment
There are no comments made yet.
  • Page :
  • 1


There are no replies made for this post yet.
However, you are not allowed to reply to this post.